Stomach Virus

You’ve probably heard people talking about the stomach bug or stomach flu going around at work or your child’s school. But what exactly is it? The technical term for this sickness is viral gastroenteritis, which is an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Food poisoning is different. It’s more common than the stomach bug. About 1 in 6 Americans, or roughly 48 million people, experience food poisoning each year.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms

Symptoms of a stomach bug

If you have the stomach bug, or viral gastroenteritis, you may have one or more of the following symptoms:
  • diarrhea
  • stomach cramps
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • a fever
  • weight loss
  • joint aches
  • muscle aches

Symptoms of food poisoning

Typical symptoms of food poisoning include:
  • stomach cramping
  • fatigue
  • diarrhea or constipation
  • a fever
  • chills
  • muscle aches
  • headaches
  • sweating
  • thirst
  • general malaise
In severe cases, you can have:
  • bloody stool or vomit
  • severe abdominal cramping
  • shock
  • a loss of consciousness
The symptoms of food poisoning usually appear two to six hours after initial exposure. Symptoms typically don’t last longer than two days. Food poisoning can occur in anyone, but it is most common in babies, young children, and the elderly. Most forms of food poisoning aren’t lethal. One form called botulism can even be fatal if they’re not treated properly. A strain of bacteria called Clostridium botulinum causes botulism. It produces toxins that impact the nervous system. Botulism can cause blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, as well as other symptoms. See your doctor if you suspect you have botulism. Botulism is extremely rare in the United States. If you are experiencing stomach virus call us today.
    Source: https://www.healthline.com/
Anxiety - Grace ER Health Tips

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. Anxiety is a normal response to stress. But when it becomes hard to control and affects your day-to-day life, it can be disabling. Anxiety disorders affect nearly one in five adults in the United States. Women are more than twice as likely as men to get an anxiety disorder in their lifetime. Anxiety disorders are often treated with counseling, medicine, or a combination of both. Some women also find that yoga or meditation helps with anxiety disorders.    
source: https://medlineplus.gov/anxiety.html
Eye Infection - Grace ER Health Tips

Eye infection

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are
  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pink eye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye - a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.
Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.
https://medlineplus.gov/eyeinfections.html#cat_78

Dehydration

What is Dehydration? What Causes It?

Dehydration happens when your body doesn’t have as much water as it needs. Without enough, your body can’t function properly. You can have mild, moderate, or severe dehydration depending on how much fluid is missing from your body.

Causes

It’s normal to lose water from your body every day by sweating, breathing, peeing, and pooping, and through tears and saliva (spit). Usually, you replace the lost liquid by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. If you lose too much water or don’t drink and eat enough, you can get dehydrated. You can lose more water than usual with:
  • A fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Excessive sweating
  • Peeing a lot (Diabetes and some medications like water pills -- also called diuretics -- can make you pee more often.)
You may not replace the water you lose because:
  • You’re busy and forget to drink enough.
  • You don’t realize you’re thirsty.
  • You don’t feel like drinking because you have a sore throat or mouthsores, or you’re sick to your stomach.

Symptoms

Signs of mild or moderate dehydration include:
  • Thirst
  • Dry or sticky mouth
  • Not peeing very much
  • Dark yellow pee
  • Dry, cool skin
  • Headache
  • Muscle cramps
Signs of severe dehydration include:
  • Not peeing or having very dark yellow pee
  • Very  dry skin
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid breathing
  • Sunken eyes
  • Sleepiness, lack of energy, confusion or irritability
  • Fainting
Symptoms for babies and young children can be different than for adults:
  • Dry mouth and tongue
  • No tears when crying
  • Dry diapers for 3 hours
  • Sunken eyes, cheeks, soft spot on the top of the skull
  • Sleepiness, lack of energy, or irritability
Severe dehydration is a medical emergency and needs to be treated immediately.
Source: https://www.webmd.com

Good Fats vs. Bad Fats

Most people view fat as something that needs to be avoided. This is only partially true, as the body needs fat to aid in the absorption of certain nutrients, support the growth of cells, for energy, and to act as a type of cushion for its organs. There are two categories when it comes to fat: good fats and bad fats. Because of the impact they can have on one's health, it is important to be aware of the differences when buying and cooking food. There are also two types of bad fats and two types of good fats. Saturated and trans fats are both considered bad. Saturated fats are primarily from animal sources but also include tropical oils such as palm or coconut oils. Trans fats are oils that have been chemically processed so that they become more solid or semi-solid. Margarine is an example of trans fat. Eating foods that contain trans fats increases a person's risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes and also elevates bad, or LDL, cholesterol and lowers good, or HDL, cholesterol. Saturated fats also raise cholesterol and are associated with coronary heart disease. Good fats are unsaturated fats such as monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat. At room temperature, these fats are typically liquid. They include plant oils and avocado and nut oils, and they include omega-3 fats that come from certain fish, such as salmon and mackerel, and from flaxseed, soybean, and other sources. Unlike bad fats, these good fats help lower bad cholesterol and protect against certain diseases, such as heart disease. Whenever possible, good fats should be used as substitutes for bad fats. But although they are considered good, they should still be used in moderation.
  • Fats 101 (PDF): This document has educational information for anyone interested in learning about bad and good fats found in food. Readers will find a chart on good and bad fats that covers what foods each can be found in, how they affect the heart, their characteristics, and daily limits. Additional information covered in this document includes the different types of good and bad fat, how to live sensibly, and whether switching to good fats aids in weight loss.
  • Good Fats, Bad Fats: Click on this page to review a chart on good and bad fats and to read information that will help explain both good and bad fats.
  • Fats Fact Sheet (PDF): Read this fact sheet on fats to learn about the different types of good and bad fats and their food sources. This page also includes some fun fat facts.
  • Good Fat, Bad Fat, Low Fat, No Fat: This article discusses all types of fat and why some are good for consumption and why others are not. In addition, the article also touches on understanding the fat information on product labels.
  • Fat Substitution and Low-Fat Cooking (PDF): Upon opening this document, readers will find facts on fats, information on good vs. bad fats including a chart, and how to make changes while cooking so that bad fats are reduced and good fats are increased.
Reducing salt intake can prevent high blood pressure.

      Reducing Sodium Intake

High blood pressure is one of the primary risks when it comes to too much sodium intake. Elevated blood pressure is a condition that can lead to other problems that can threaten one's life, such as kidney disease, heart disease, or even heart failure. Excess sodium does this by causing water retention, which puts a strain on the arteries, kidneys, and heart. According to the latest dietary guidelines for Americans, people who are 2 years old or older should keep their daily sodium intake below 2,300 mg. Certain people, including people with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or high blood pressure, should limit their daily sodium consumption to 1,500 mg. This lower sodium intake is also recommended for African Americans and people who are 51 years old or older. People get sodium from a number of sources, most commonly salt. In addition to salt, sodium comes from sources that include baking soda and baking powder. Salt is added to many foods, particularly those that are processed and prepackaged. Ask for unsalted french fries to reduce sodium intake To reduce salt intake, people must check the labels of the foods that they purchase, which will tell them how much is in the product. They should also avoid foods that have the word "salted" in the name and purchase items that are low-sodium or have no salt added. Canned foods, frozen dinners, hot dogs, and luncheon meats are all examples of foods that contain heavy amounts of salt. People can also limit the amount of salt that they add when cooking at home by using herbs and spices as flavor substitutes. Using fresh vegetables and fruits is also a way to cut back on sodium

Drink water, Live Longer

7 Science-Based Health Benefits of Drinking Enough Water

Our bodies are around 60% water, give or take. It is commonly recommended to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day (the 8x8 rule). Although there is little science behind this specific rule, staying hydrated is important. Here are 7 evidence-based health benefits of drinking plenty of water.   1. Water Helps to Maximize Physical Performance If we do not stay hydrated, physical performance can suffer. This is particularly important during intense exercise or high heat. Dehydration can have a noticeable effect if you lose as little as 2% of your body's water content. However, it is not uncommon for athletes to lose up to 6-10% of their water weight via sweat. This can lead to altered body temperature control, reduced motivation, increased fatigue and make exercise feel much more difficult, both physically and mentally. Optimal hydration has been shown to prevent this from happening, and may even reduce the oxidative stress that occurs during high intensity exercise. This is not surprising when you consider that muscle is about 80% water. So, if you exercise intensely and tend to sweat, then staying hydrated can help you perform at your absolute best.   2. Hydration Has a Major Effect on Energy Levels and Brain Function Your brain is strongly influenced by hydration status. Studies show that even mild dehydration (1-3% of body weight) can impair many aspects of brain function. In a study of young women, fluid loss of 1.36% after exercise impaired both mood and concentration, and increased the frequency of headaches. Another similar study, this time in young men, showed that fluid loss of 1.59% was detrimental to working memory and increased feelings of anxiety and fatigue. A 1-3% fluid loss equals about 1.5-4.5 lbs (0.5-2 kg) of body weight loss for a 150 lbs (68 kg) person. This can easily occur through normal daily activities, let alone during exercise or high heat. Many other studies, ranging from children to the elderly, have shown that mild dehydration can impair mood, memory and brain performance.   3. Drinking Water May Help to Prevent and Treat Headaches Dehydration can trigger headaches and migraines in some individuals. Several studies have shown that water can relieve headaches in those who are dehydrated. However, this appears to depend on the type of headache. One study of 18 people found that water had no effect on the frequency of headaches, but did reduce the intensity and duration somewhat.   4. Drinking More Water May Help Relieve Constipation Constipation is a common problem, characterized by infrequent bowel movements and difficulty passing stool. Increasing fluid intake is often recommended as a part of the treatment protocol, and there is some evidence to back this up. Low water consumption appears to be a risk factor for constipation in both young and elderly individuals. Carbonated water shows particularly promising results for constipation relief, although the reason is not entirely understood.   5. Drinking Water May Help Treat Kidney Stones Urinary stones are painful clumps of mineral crystal that form in the urinary system. The most common form is kidney stones, which form in the kidneys. There is limited evidence that water intake can help prevent recurrence in people who have previously gotten kidney stones. Higher fluid intake increases the volume of urine passing through the kidneys, which dilutes the concentration of minerals, so they are less likely to crystallize and form clumps. Water may also help prevent the initial formation of stones, but studies are required to confirm this.   6. Water Helps Prevent Hangovers A hangover refers to the unpleasant symptoms experienced after drinking alcohol. Alcohol is a diuretic, so it makes you lose more water than you take in. This can lead to dehydration. Although dehydration is not the main cause of hangovers, it can cause symptoms like thirst, fatigue, headache and dry mouth. A good way to reduce hangovers is to drink a glass of water between drinks, and to have at least one big glass of water before going to bed.   7. Drinking More Water Can Help With Weight Loss Drinking plenty of water can help you lose weight. This is due to the fact that water can increase satiety and boost your metabolic rate. In two studies, drinking half a liter (17 ounces) of water was shown to increase metabolism by 24-30% for up to 1.5 hours. This means that drinking 2 liters of water every day can increase your total energy expenditure by up to 96 calories per day. The timing is important too, and drinking water half an hour before meals is the most effective. It can make you feel more full, so that you eat fewer calories. In one study, dieters who drank half a liter of water before meals lost 44% more weight, over a period of 12 weeks. It is actually best to drink water cold, because then the body will use additional energy (calories) to heat the water to body temperature.
           

Diabetes: Don’t cut corners, get help

  The costs of managing diabetes can take their toll. A year’s worth of routine care — medication, glucose test strips, syringes, and other supplies, as well as doctor appointments — can run about $6,000. And that doesn’t include the costs for any complications.   However, cutting back on tests or treatments to save money may compromise your efforts to control your condition, according to one study. More than half of the people who were unsuccessful in managing their condition said they had put off going to a doctor, didn’t fill a prescription, or tried other cost-cutting measures.   Instead of skimping on care, get the most for your healthcare dollars. Check your health plan. Many insurance companies offer disease-management programs for people with diabetes so they can take control of their condition and reduce any health issues.   Many disease management programs offer 24/7access to a registered nurse. "Advice nurses" usually provide general tips on managing diabetes. Many have access to your medical records, so they can provide personalized recommendations.   Also, ask your pharmacist or health plan about lower cost glucose monitor and test strip combinations. Sometimes, an inexpensive monitor and more costly test strips can add up to higher costs than if you buy a more expensive monitor with less expensive test strips. Ask your doctor about whether she or he can suggest lower cost, equally effective medications to control your diabetes.

Why Is This Flu Season So Deadly?

According to www.cnn.com, This flu season is fierce and has already claimed the lives of at least 37 children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There were 11,965 laboratory-confirmed flu-related hospitalizations reported from October 1 to January 20. The number of people infected with influenza is believed to be much higher because not everyone goes to their doctor when they are sick, nor do doctors test every patient. Added to those scary stats, the World Health Organization estimates that annual flu epidemics result in about 3 to 5 million cases of severe illness globally and 290,000 to 650,000 deaths. Although the fever and aches may feel terrible, most of us don't die from the flu. So how exactly does this common illness lead to so many dying? "Influenza and its complications disproportionately affect people who are 65 and older. They account for 80% of the deaths," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University. But young children and people who have an underlying illness, such as heart disease, lung disease or diabetes, are susceptible to dying from the flu as well, he said. There are three ways adults can succumb to Pneumonia.

What is pneumonia?

"The usual flu death is a person who gets influenza, gets all that inflammation in their chest, and then has the complication of pneumonia," explained Schaffner, who added that this is a "long, drawn-out process." Pneumonia is an infection that causes the small air sacs of the lungs to fill with fluid or pus. Though this is the most common route to death, flu can be fatal for more unusual reasons. Click here for flu prevention   Source- cnn