Asthma

Sometimes asthma symptoms are mild and go away on their own or after minimal treatment with asthma medicine. Other times, symptoms continue to get worse.

When symptoms get more intense and/or more symptoms occur, you’re having an asthma attack. Asthma attacks also are called flareups or exacerbations (eg-zas-er-BA-shuns).

Treating symptoms when you first notice them is important. This will help prevent the symptoms from worsening and causing a severe asthma attack. Severe asthma attacks may require emergency care, and they can be fatal.

Asthma (AZ-ma) is a chronic (long-term) lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. Asthma causes recurring periods of wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. The coughing often occurs at night or early in the morning.

Asthma affects people of all ages, but it most often starts during childhood. In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children.

Overview

To understand asthma, it helps to know how the airways work. The airways are tubes that carry air into and out of your lungs. People who have asthma have inflamed airways. The inflammation makes the airways swollen and very sensitive. The airways tend to react strongly to certain inhaled substances.

When the airways react, the muscles around them tighten. This narrows the airways, causing less air to flow into the lungs. The swelling also can worsen, making the airways even narrower. Cells in the airways might make more mucus than usual. Mucus is a sticky, thick liquid that can further narrow the airways.

This chain reaction can result in asthma symptoms. Symptoms can happen each time the airways are inflamed.

 

Source – www.nhlbi.nih.gov

Anemia

What Is Anemia?

Anemia is a condition that develops when your blood lacks enough healthy red blood cells or hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a main part of red blood cells and binds oxygen. If you have too few or abnormal red blood cells, or your hemoglobin is abnormal or low, the cells in your body will not get enough oxygen. Symptoms of anemia — like fatigue — occur because organs aren’t getting what they need to function properly.

What Causes Anemia ?

There are more than 400 types of anemia, which are divided into three groups:

  • Anemia caused by blood loss
  • Anemia caused by decreased or faulty red blood cell production
  • Anemia caused by destruction of red blood cells

 How Do I Know if I Have Anemia?

To diagnose anemia, your doctor will likely ask you about your medical history, perform a physical exam, and order blood tests.

Blood tests will not only confirm the diagnosis of anemia, but also help point to the underlying condition. Tests might include:

  • Complete blood count (CBC), which determines the number, size, volume, and hemoglobin content of red blood cells
  • Blood iron level and your serum ferritin level, the best indicators of your body’s total iron stores
  • Levels of vitamin B12 and folate, vitamins necessary for red blood cell production
  • Special blood tests to detect rare causes of anemia, such as an immune attack on your red blood cells, red blood cell fragility, and defects of enzymes, hemoglobin, and clotting
  • Reticulocyte count, bilirubin, and other blood and urine tests to determine how quickly your blood cells are being made or if you have a hemolytic anemia, where your red blood cells have a shortened life span

What Are the Treatments for Anemia?

Your doctor may not treat your anemia until the underlying cause has been established. The treatment for one type of anemia may be both inappropriate and dangerous for another type of anemia.

Source: https://www.webmd.com

What are Lice?

What are Lice?

Head lice are tiny, wingless insects that live on the human scalp. They are about as big as sesame seeds. Head lice sustain themselves by sucking blood—just as mosquitoes do. However, unlike mosquitoes, lice cannot fly or jump from one person to another; they can only crawl. Children often get head lice from head-to-head contact with other children, but may also get them by sharing personal items such as hats, combs, or headbands

What are lice, eggs (nits)?

Lice eggs are laid by the female louse. They are about the size of a poppy seed and are difficult to see because their color blends in easily with hair. Lice eggs are laid near the root of the hair and are attached to the hair shaft with a glue-like substance that can’t be washed or blown away.

Nits are the empty eggshells left behind when lice hatch from eggs. Dandruff, sand and flakes of hairspray are commonly mistaken for lice eggs or nits. Eggs and nits are not easily removed and must be carefully combed out with a fine-tooth comb.

Eggs and nits vary in color, from yellowish-brown to white. Since the hair grows, nits are usually found further away from the root of the hair. Many schools have a “No Nit Policy,” which means children who have had head lice are not readmitted to school until all the nits are gone. If you have seen live lice on your child’s head, it is very important to comb out eggs and nits as part of the lice treatment process. Lice treatment products should not be used if lice or nits have not been seen

How long do head lice live?

Head lice live for approximately 40–50 days and go through 3 stages in their life cycle:

Egg Stage: The female louse lays the egg with a special glue that cements it to the hair shaft near the root. The lice egg develops and hatches approximately 10 days later.

Nymph Stage: Once the louse hatches, it is called a nymph and is barely visible to the naked eye. The nymph cannot reproduce because it is not fully developed. After about 12 days, it becomes an adult.

Adult Stage: The female adult louse can lay up to 10 eggs per a day—starting another generation of lice. The adult stage lasts about 30 days. Lice do not live longer than 2 days if they are separated from the head.

How to Get RID® of Lice

getting-rid-of-lice-video-img

Learning that someone in your family has lice is never welcome news. But there’s no need to feel overwhelmed by the prospect of getting rid of lice or preventing them from coming back. With the right information about what kills them, and the right tools, you will be better prepared to get RID® of them.

Subchorionic hemorrhage

In pregnancy, some types of bleeding are a big issue, while others are not. Subchorionic bleeding is just one type of bleeding. Some cases can become serious, while others don’t adversely affect the pregnancy. But it’s important to call your doctor right away when you experience any form of vaginal bleeding.

Subchorionic bleeding occurs when the placenta detaches from the original site of implantation. This is called a subchorionic hemorrhage or hematoma. It affects the chorionic membranes. These membranes lift apart and form another sac between the placenta and the uterus. The movement and resulting clots are what cause this type of bleeding.

These hematomas can range in size, with the smallest being most common. Larger versions can cause heavier bleeding.

Bleeding that goes beyond a few spots and requires a panty liner is often a sign of something else. Subchorionic bleeding is one such possibility. Bleeding tends to be the only sign or symptom of subchorionic hematoma. You may not even realize you have one until your doctor performs an ultrasound.

If a diagnosis of vaginal bleeding is deemed subchorionic, then your doctor will likely start treatments to prevent miscarriage. Options may include progesterone or dydrogesterone. If the hematomas are large, you may also be ordered to:

  • stay in bed (bed rest)
  • avoid standing for long periods of time
  • avoid sex
  • avoid exercise
  • https://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/subchorionic-bleeding#1

Stomach Virus

You’ve probably heard people talking about the stomach bug or stomach flu going around at work or your child’s school. But what exactly is it? The technical term for this sickness is viral gastroenteritis, which is an inflammation of the stomach and intestines.

Food poisoning is different. It’s more common than the stomach bug. About 1 in 6 Americans, or roughly 48 million people, experience food poisoning each year.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms

Symptoms of a stomach bug

If you have the stomach bug, or viral gastroenteritis, you may have one or more of the following symptoms:

  • diarrhea
  • stomach cramps
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • a fever
  • weight loss
  • joint aches
  • muscle aches

Symptoms of food poisoning

Typical symptoms of food poisoning include:

  • stomach cramping
  • fatigue
  • diarrhea or constipation
  • a fever
  • chills
  • muscle aches
  • headaches
  • sweating
  • thirst
  • general malaise

In severe cases, you can have:

  • bloody stool or vomit
  • severe abdominal cramping
  • shock
  • a loss of consciousness

The symptoms of food poisoning usually appear two to six hours after initial exposure. Symptoms typically don’t last longer than two days. Food poisoning can occur in anyone, but it is most common in babies, young children, and the elderly.

Most forms of food poisoning aren’t lethal. One form called botulism can even be fatal if they’re not treated properly. A strain of bacteria called Clostridium botulinum causes botulism. It produces toxins that impact the nervous system. Botulism can cause blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, as well as other symptoms. See your doctor if you suspect you have botulism. Botulism is extremely rare in the United States.

If you are experiencing stomach virus call us today.

 

 

Source: https://www.healthline.com/

Anxiety - Grace ER Health Tips

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful – it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include

Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both.

Anxiety is a normal response to stress. But when it becomes hard to control and affects your day-to-day life, it can be disabling. Anxiety disorders affect nearly one in five adults in the United States. Women are more than twice as likely as men to get an anxiety disorder in their lifetime. Anxiety disorders are often treated with counseling, medicine, or a combination of both. Some women also find that yoga or meditation helps with anxiety disorders.

 

 

source: https://medlineplus.gov/anxiety.html
Eye Infection - Grace ER Health Tips

Eye infection

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis – also known as pink eye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye – a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.

https://medlineplus.gov/eyeinfections.html#cat_78

Dehydration

What is Dehydration? What Causes It?

Dehydration happens when your body doesn’t have as much water as it needs. Without enough, your body can’t function properly. You can have mild, moderate, or severe dehydration depending on how much fluid is missing from your body.

Causes

It’s normal to lose water from your body every day by sweating, breathing, peeing, and pooping, and through tears and saliva (spit). Usually, you replace the lost liquid by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. If you lose too much water or don’t drink and eat enough, you can get dehydrated.

You can lose more water than usual with:

  • A fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Excessive sweating
  • Peeing a lot (Diabetes and some medications like water pills — also called diuretics — can make you pee more often.)

You may not replace the water you lose because:

  • You’re busy and forget to drink enough.
  • You don’t realize you’re thirsty.
  • You don’t feel like drinking because you have a sore throat or mouthsores, or you’re sick to your stomach.

Symptoms

Signs of mild or moderate dehydration include:

  • Thirst
  • Dry or sticky mouth
  • Not peeing very much
  • Dark yellow pee
  • Dry, cool skin
  • Headache
  • Muscle cramps

Signs of severe dehydration include:

  • Not peeing or having very dark yellow pee
  • Very  dry skin
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid breathing
  • Sunken eyes
  • Sleepiness, lack of energy, confusion or irritability
  • Fainting

Symptoms for babies and young children can be different than for adults:

  • Dry mouth and tongue
  • No tears when crying
  • Dry diapers for 3 hours
  • Sunken eyes, cheeks, soft spot on the top of the skull
  • Sleepiness, lack of energy, or irritability

Severe dehydration is a medical emergency and needs to be treated immediately.

Source: https://www.webmd.com

Drink water, Live Longer

7 Science-Based Health Benefits of Drinking Enough Water

Our bodies are around 60% water, give or take.

It is commonly recommended to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day (the 8×8 rule).

Although there is little science behind this specific rule, staying hydrated is important.

Here are 7 evidence-based health benefits of drinking plenty of water.

 

1. Water Helps to Maximize Physical Performance
If we do not stay hydrated, physical performance can suffer.

This is particularly important during intense exercise or high heat.

Dehydration can have a noticeable effect if you lose as little as 2% of your body’s water content. However, it is not uncommon for athletes to lose up to 6-10% of their water weight via sweat.

This can lead to altered body temperature control, reduced motivation, increased fatigue and make exercise feel much more difficult, both physically and mentally.

Optimal hydration has been shown to prevent this from happening, and may even reduce the oxidative stress that occurs during high intensity exercise. This is not surprising when you consider that muscle is about 80% water.

So, if you exercise intensely and tend to sweat, then staying hydrated can help you perform at your absolute best.

 

2. Hydration Has a Major Effect on Energy Levels and Brain Function
Your brain is strongly influenced by hydration status.

Studies show that even mild dehydration (1-3% of body weight) can impair many aspects of brain function.

In a study of young women, fluid loss of 1.36% after exercise impaired both mood and concentration, and increased the frequency of headaches.

Another similar study, this time in young men, showed that fluid loss of 1.59% was detrimental to working memory and increased feelings of anxiety and fatigue.

A 1-3% fluid loss equals about 1.5-4.5 lbs (0.5-2 kg) of body weight loss for a 150 lbs (68 kg) person. This can easily occur through normal daily activities, let alone during exercise or high heat.

Many other studies, ranging from children to the elderly, have shown that mild dehydration can impair mood, memory and brain performance.

 

3. Drinking Water May Help to Prevent and Treat Headaches
Dehydration can trigger headaches and migraines in some individuals.

Several studies have shown that water can relieve headaches in those who are dehydrated.

However, this appears to depend on the type of headache.

One study of 18 people found that water had no effect on the frequency of headaches, but did reduce the intensity and duration somewhat.

 

4. Drinking More Water May Help Relieve Constipation
Constipation is a common problem, characterized by infrequent bowel movements and difficulty passing stool.

Increasing fluid intake is often recommended as a part of the treatment protocol, and there is some evidence to back this up.

Low water consumption appears to be a risk factor for constipation in both young and elderly individuals.

Carbonated water shows particularly promising results for constipation relief, although the reason is not entirely understood.

 

5. Drinking Water May Help Treat Kidney Stones
Urinary stones are painful clumps of mineral crystal that form in the urinary system.

The most common form is kidney stones, which form in the kidneys.

There is limited evidence that water intake can help prevent recurrence in people who have previously gotten kidney stones.

Higher fluid intake increases the volume of urine passing through the kidneys, which dilutes the concentration of minerals, so they are less likely to crystallize and form clumps.

Water may also help prevent the initial formation of stones, but studies are required to confirm this.

 

6. Water Helps Prevent Hangovers
A hangover refers to the unpleasant symptoms experienced after drinking alcohol.

Alcohol is a diuretic, so it makes you lose more water than you take in. This can lead to dehydration.

Although dehydration is not the main cause of hangovers, it can cause symptoms like thirst, fatigue, headache and dry mouth.

A good way to reduce hangovers is to drink a glass of water between drinks, and to have at least one big glass of water before going to bed.

 

7. Drinking More Water Can Help With Weight Loss
Drinking plenty of water can help you lose weight.

This is due to the fact that water can increase satiety and boost your metabolic rate.

In two studies, drinking half a liter (17 ounces) of water was shown to increase metabolism by 24-30% for up to 1.5 hours.

This means that drinking 2 liters of water every day can increase your total energy expenditure by up to 96 calories per day.

The timing is important too, and drinking water half an hour before meals is the most effective. It can make you feel more full, so that you eat fewer calories.

In one study, dieters who drank half a liter of water before meals lost 44% more weight, over a period of 12 weeks.

It is actually best to drink water cold, because then the body will use additional energy (calories) to heat the water to body temperature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 2 3