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Anxiety - Grace ER Health Tips

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful – it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include

Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both.

Anxiety is a normal response to stress. But when it becomes hard to control and affects your day-to-day life, it can be disabling. Anxiety disorders affect nearly one in five adults in the United States. Women are more than twice as likely as men to get an anxiety disorder in their lifetime. Anxiety disorders are often treated with counseling, medicine, or a combination of both. Some women also find that yoga or meditation helps with anxiety disorders.

 

 

source: https://medlineplus.gov/anxiety.html
Eye Infection - Grace ER Health Tips

Eye infection

Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are

  • Conjunctivitis – also known as pink eye. Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. Children frequently get it, and it is very contagious.
  • Stye – a bump on the eyelid that happens when bacteria from your skin get into the hair follicle of an eyelash.

Symptoms of eye infections may include redness, itching, swelling, discharge, pain, or problems with vision. Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics.

https://medlineplus.gov/eyeinfections.html#cat_78

SHINGLES

Shingles is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. Although shingles can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you’ve had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles.

While it isn’t a life-threatening condition, shingles can be very painful. Vaccines can help reduce the risk of shingles, while early treatment can help shorten a shingles infection and lessen the chance of complications

The signs and symptoms of shingles usually affect only a small section of one side of your body. These signs and symptoms may include:

Symptoms

  • Pain, burning, numbness or tingling
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • A red rash that begins a few days after the pain
  • Fluid-filled blisters that break open and crust over
  • Itching

Some people also experience:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Fatigue

Pain is usually the first symptom of shingles. For some, it can be intense. Depending on the location of the pain, it can sometimes be mistaken for a symptom of problems affecting the heart, lungs or kidneys. Some people experience shingles pain without ever developing the rash.

Most commonly, the shingles rash develops as a stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or right side of your torso. Sometimes the shingles rash occurs around one eye or on one side of the neck or face.

When to see a doctor

Contact your doctor promptly if you suspect shingles, but especially in the following situations:

  • The pain and rash occur near an eye. If left untreated, this infection can lead to permanent eye damage.
  • You’re 60 or older, because age significantly increases your risk of complications.
  • You or someone in your family has a weakened immune system (due to cancer, medications or chronic illness).
  • The rash is widespread and painfu
  • Causes

  • Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. Anyone who’s had chickenpox may develop shingles. After you recover from chickenpox, the virus can enter your nervous system and lie dormant for years.Eventually, it may reactivate and travel along nerve pathways to your skin — producing shingles. But, not everyone who’s had chickenpox will develop shingles.The reason for shingles is unclear. But it may be due to lowered immunity to infections as you grow older. Shingles is more common in older adults and in people who have weakened immune systems.Varicella-zoster is part of a group of viruses called herpes viruses, which includes the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. Because of this, shingles is also known as herpes zoster. But the virus that causes chickenpox and shingles is not the same virus responsible for cold sores or genital herpes, a sexually transmitted infection
  • Risk factors

    Anyone who has ever had chickenpox can develop shingles. Most adults in the United States had chickenpox when they were children, before the advent of the routine childhood vaccination that now protects against chickenpox.

    Factors that may increase your risk of developing shingles include:

    • Being older than 50. Shingles is most common in people older than 50. The risk increases with age. Some experts estimate that half the people age 80 and older will have shingles.
    • Having certain diseases. Diseases that weaken your immune system, such as HIV/AIDS and cancer, can increase your risk of shingles.
    • Undergoing cancer treatments. Radiation or chemotherapy can lower your resistance to diseases and may trigger shingles.
    • Taking certain medications. Drugs designed to prevent rejection of transplanted organs can increase your risk of shingles — as can prolonged use of steroids, such as prednisone.

    Complications

    Complications from shingles can include:

    • Postherpetic neuralgia. For some people, shingles pain continues long after the blisters have cleared. This condition is known as postherpetic neuralgia, and it occurs when damaged nerve fibers send confused and exaggerated messages of pain from your skin to your brain.
    • Vision loss. Shingles in or around an eye (ophthalmic shingles) can cause painful eye infections that may result in vision loss.
    • Neurological problems. Depending on which nerves are affected, shingles can cause an inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), facial paralysis, or hearing or balance problems.
    • Skin infections. If shingles blisters aren’t properly treated, bacterial skin infections may develop.

    Prevention

    Two vaccines may help prevent shingles — the chickenpox (varicella) vaccine and the shingles (varicella-zoster) vaccine.

    Chickenpox vaccine

    The varicella vaccine (Varivax) has become a routine childhood immunization to prevent chickenpox. The vaccine is also recommended for adults who’ve never had chickenpox. Though the vaccine doesn’t guarantee you won’t get chickenpox or shingles, it can reduce your chances of complications and reduce the severity of the disease.

    Shingles vaccine

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of the varicella-zoster vaccine (Zostavax) for adults age 50 and older, whether they’ve already had shingles or not. Although the vaccine is approved for people age 50 and older, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention isn’t recommending it until you reach age 60 or older, when the risk of shingles and its complications is highest.

    Your doctor may recommend vaccination between ages 50 and 59 if you have a condition or circumstance that may make it more difficult to tolerate a shingles infection, such as chronic pain or if you have received or expect to receive certain medications that suppress the immune system.

    As with the chickenpox vaccine, the shingles vaccine doesn’t guarantee you won’t get shingles. But this vaccine will likely reduce the course and severity of the disease and reduce your risk of postherpetic neuralgia within the first five years after vaccination. Protection beyond five years is uncertain.

    The shingles vaccine is used only as a prevention strategy. It’s not intended to treat people who currently have the disease. The vaccine contains live virus and should not be given to people who are pregnant or have weakened immune systems.

  • Treatments For Shingles

    There is no cure for shingles, so treatment for the condition is primarily focused on reducing the severity of symptoms and, ideally, decreasing the longevity of the outbreak. Individuals are encouraged to seek treatment as early as possible to prevent the infection from becoming worse.For initial outbreaks of shingles, at-home or over-the-counter (OTC) options may be sufficient for reducing symptom severity and preventing the condition from having a detrimental impact on the individual’s daily functioning. Techniques such as taking an oatmeal bath, applying calamine lotion regularly to the rash, or using cool compresses on the area can be effective in decreasing itchiness and soothing irritated skin.

  • Oral analgesics that can be obtained OTC, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), may be recommended to reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Antiviral or oral steroid medications may also be prescribed by your doctor, depending on the severity of symptoms.

    Alternative techniques may be employed, in conjunction with other techniques, to provide additional relief from symptoms. In particular, participating in yoga or regular relaxation practice is shown to reduce the individual’s overall degree of stress contributing to the shingles infection.

    Since the development of the chickenpox vaccine, there has been some suggestion that it may also help in preventing the development of shingles. This vaccine is not intended to cure the condition; however, it has been shown to reduce an individual’s risk for manifesting shingles in adulthood, even among populations of older adults

What is strep throat?

Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. This common condition is caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria. Strep throat can affect children and adults of all ages. However, it’s especially common in children between the ages of 5 and 15Sneezing and coughing can spread the infection from one person to another.

Symptoms of strep throat

The severity of strep throat can vary from person-to-person. Some people experience mild symptoms like a sore throat, whereas other people have more severe symptoms including fever and difficulty swallowing. The common symptoms of strep throat include:

The symptoms of strep throat typically develop within five days of exposure to the bacteria.

3 Levels Of Heat-Related Illness

While spending time outside is a great way to get fresh air and exercise, spending too much time in sweltering heat without relief can be dangerous. Prolonged exposure to heat can lead to heat-related illnesses like mild heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or severe heat stroke. Each level of illness causes different symptoms. Knowing the warning signs will help you identify the degree of seriousness and how you should respond.

1. Heat Cramps

Heat cramps are painful muscle cramps or spasms in the abdomen, arms, or legs. They’re the first sign of heat illness, and your condition can worsen if you don’t cool down. Heat cramps typically occur after intense exercise or sweating in high heat. You may also experience flushed, moist skin.
First Aid

  • Move to a cool place to rest.
  • Loosen your clothing and fan skin.
  • Sip cool sports drinks containing salt and sugar.
  • Stretch your muscles slowly.

2. Heat Exhaustion

More severe than heat cramps, heat exhaustion can include excessive sweating, clammy skin, a fever over 100.4° F, dizziness, headaches, nausea, and a fast, weak pulse. Heat exhaustion can escalate to heat stroke if left untreated.
First Aid

  • Move to a cool place to rest.
  • Loosen your clothing and fan skin to cool down.
  • Sip cool sports drinks containing salt and sugar.
  • If you experience no improvement, get medical help right away.

3. Heat Stroke

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness and requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms include a high body temperature of 103°F or higher, warm and dry skin, confusion or slurred speech, agitation, nausea, vomiting, and a rapid heart rate. Seizures and loss of consciousness are possible.
First Aid

  • Call 911 right away.
  • Move to a cool, shaded area until medical help arrives.
  • Remove excess clothing and fan the skin.
  • Place cold, wet cloths on skin and ice bags on groin and armpit areas.

Allergies

An allergy is a reaction by your immune system to something that does not bother most other people. People who have allergies often are sensitive to more than one thing. Substances that often cause reactions are

Normally, your immune system fights germs. It is your body’s defense system. In most allergic reactions, however, it is responding to a false alarm. Genes and the environment probably both play a role.

Allergies can cause a variety of symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, itching, rashes, swelling, or asthma. Allergies can range from minor to severe. Anaphylaxis is a severe reaction that can be life-threatening. Doctors use skin and blood tests to diagnose allergies. Treatments include medicines, allergy shots, and avoiding the substances that cause the reactions.

 

source: https://medlineplus.gov/allergy.html

Urinary Tract Infection

Symptoms:
Urinary tract infections do not always have symptoms but some may include:
The urge to urinate
A burning sensation upon urination
small amounts of urine
Urine that looks cloudy
red, bright pink or cola-colored — might be blood in the urine
abnormal odor in urine
Pain in pelvic, in females — center of the pelvis and area surrounding the pubic bone

Types of UTI
Kidneys (acute pyelonephritis)
Upper back and side pain
High fever
Shaking and chills
Nausea
Vomit
Bladder (cystitis)
Pelvic pressure
Lower abdomen discomfort
Frequent, painful urination
Blood in urine
Urethra (urethritis)
Burning upon urination
Discharge

Description:
UTI’s typically happens when a bacteria enters the urinary tract through the urethra, and it spreads. When this occurs, bacteria may grow and develop into an infection in the urinary tract.
UTI’s are more common in women.
Infection of the bladder is commonly caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli), which is more likely found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, there may be other bacteria also responsible. Sexual intercourse may also cause cystitis.
Infection of the urethra happens when GI bacteria spread from the anus to the urethra. The female urethra is close to the vagina which causes sexually transmitted infections.

Treatment:
Antibiotics are the first line treatment for UTI. The drugs prescribed and for how long depends on your health condition and which type of bacteria is found in your urine.
Medicines commonly recommended for simple UTIs include:
Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, others)
Fosfomycin (Monurol)
Nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Macrobid)
Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
Cephalexin (Keflex)
Ceftriaxone (Rocephin)
Azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax)
Doxycycline (Monodox, Vibramycin, others)
Commonly symptoms clear up within a few days of treatment. However, you may need to continue antibiotics until the antibiotics are gone.

Stitches

Serious cuts or incisions from surgical procedures may require stitches, or sutures, to hold tissues together while they heal. The goal is to piece together the edges so that skin and other tissues can fuse back together. Then the stitches are removed.

Although it’s natural to feel a little anxious if you’re getting stitches, especially if you’ve just experienced trauma. And stitches will help cuts heal with minimal scarring or risk for infection.

Signs a Cut May Need Stitches

It’s not always easy to tell if a cut requires stitches.  You should seek medical care for any cut that:

  • Is deep, jagged, or gaping
  • Is on the face or another part of the body where scarring may be an issue
  • Bleeds profusely without stopping after 20 minutes of direct pressure
  • Feels numb
  • Is in a hand or limb that doesn’t function properly after being cut

If any of these criteria apply to your injury, see a doctor as soon as you can. In the meantime, apply direct pressure to help control bleeding. It might also help to raise the injured area above the level of your heart, if possible.

If you are injured and have not had a tetanus shot in more than five years visit us today.

 

Source: https://www.webmd.com/